The impact of advocacy for people who use social care services: a review of the evidence

A new piece of work on the impact of advocacy has found that a lack of robust evidence leaves advocacy in a potentially vulnerable position. 

During a project funded by the National Institute for Health Research’s School of Social Care Research (SSCR), the NDTi gathered and reviewed the evidence available on the impact of different types of advocacy for people who need support.

Alison Macadam, NDTi Project Manager and co-author of the Scoping Review said:

“Our review shows there is a lack of published, robust evidence on the impact of advocacy, either in the difference it makes in people’s lives or in terms of its value for money.  At a financially difficult time, when we know funding in advocacy organisations is decreasing, this could leave advocacy in a potentially vulnerable position”.

Tom Raines, Programme Lead for NDTi’s Voice, Choice and Control programme went on to say:

“It would be wrong to conclude that the outcomes of the report mean advocacy doesn’t have a positive impact, or that it is not cost effective.  Formally and informally representing the voice of people who use social care services is vital if they are to be supported to live full and inclusive lives.  Advocacy plays a significant role in doing this.”

To find out more, and download a copy of:

  • the Scoping Review report
  • NDTi Insight (No. 19) - The impact of advocacy for people who use social care services: a review of the evidence
  • A copy of the NDTi press statement

All of the above are available through the ‘Related Documents’ bar to the right of your screen.

Please click here to read about the work NDTi are doing, funded through the Department of Health, to review the Advocacy – Quality Performance Mark.

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